Technology In The Classroom, Good Or Bad

May 5, 2015: School teachers are using technology in the classroom more easily than ever before. According to the National School Boards Association (NSBA), students who are exposed to a high volume of technology perform as well as expected on standardized test, however technology can potentially do students a disservice if used inappropriately. But the use of technology in schools is a very controversial topic.

Incorporating technology into the classroom requires a double innovation,

For example, an instructor may restructure a lecture into a group activity, having students conduct online research to boost their understanding. With such a vast reference tool, the students might pose questions that no one in the class, not even the teacher himself, can answer. Many teachers and schools choose to avoid this situation by discouraging the use of computers in a well-organized lesson. Their latest shipment of Smartboards, ELMOs, or iPads stays locked in a closet as they struggle to find the time to effectively incorporate them into the curriculum plan.

In some classrooms technology is overused. This can lead to a variety of difficulties. Many students learn best by physically and mentally interacting with what they are studying. If most of the teaching is done using a computer, these students’ needs are not being met. Technology should be used to supplement the classroom curriculum, but should not be used as the sole source of learning

Keep these things in mind when you consider your child’s daily interaction with technology…..

a) Look For Connections. When students use technology, it should be within the context of larger learning goals rather than in isolation. “Technology used in isolation is less effective than when it’s integrated into a curricular set of activities,”.

b) Don’t Assume. There are a lot of facts floating out there, and everyone has an opinion. Base your understanding of education technology on reliable sources. Pasnik suggests asking your child’s teacher about how technology is incorporated into the curriculum.

c) It’s All In The Application. The success of any tool depends on how it’s used. Ask how a gadget or program furthers higher thinking, basic skills, or the child’s ability to evaluate, analyze, and synthesize ideas. This way, you’ll ensure that it’s being used for more than its novelty.

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